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Nourish giftWhen soap becomes too small to comfortably use, do not throw it away.  Nourish soap slivers last quite long but sometimes using a little flimsy piece of soap is not so practical.   Instead, save the leftover scraps to make new bars. They can be melted down and formed without buying costly supplies or special molds.

Why throw the slivers away when they can be transformed into new bath products?

Organize and Save the Scraps in Consol Jars

Some people suggest saving soap scraps in plastic zipper bags and placing them in very hot water to make new bars. Ordinary plastic zipper bags can melt, and they should never be placed in extremely hot water. I recommend saving soap scraps in Consol jars. They can be organized, saved and melted in the storage containers, and they can be made into new bars safely and easily. Sort the scraps according to type to create new bars of the same type. Otherwise, they can be stored together to make bars that are a combination of many varieties.  I do this with my Farmhouse soap too and it makes for a lovely soap, a little bit different every time!

How to Melt the Soap Slivers

After saving enough soap scraps to make new bars, heat a shallow pan of water on the stove. It does not have to come to a full boil.  Remove it from the heat, and after soaking the jars in a sink of hot water and drying the insides, place the soap scraps inside. Place the jar(s) in the hot water. Use a wooden spoon to stir it around as it begins to soften and melt. Handle the jars with extreme caution since they will quickly become hot.

If you have a slowcooker, you can use that too.  Add all your scraps and turn the heat on high.  I usually add some boiling water, just a few splashes here and there, to help speed up the melting of the soap.  In a slowcooker the soap cannot burn so you can walk away and check back every now and then giving it a stir so it melts evenly.

Make New Bars

Grease a small loaf pan with petroleum jelly or baby oil, and pour the melted soap slivers into the pan. Place the base of the pan in a sink filled with a few inches of very cold water. It will slowly solidify. When it does, turn the pan over and pop out the large bar. It should come right out if the pan was sufficiently oiled.

Alternatively pour into the mould and let sit overnight.  The bar will be hard and ready to cut by morning.

Use a knife to cut the slab into new bars.  If you want the soap to look a bit less rough, you can shave the top of the log with a cheese slicer before cutting it into bars.

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